Feature: Chinese martial arts could become part of Botswana's police training

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GABORONE, Jan. 20 (Xinhua) -- After watching a Chinese martial arts expert train several police officers on Friday, Botswana's Minister of Defence and Security Kagiso Thomas Mmusi appeared satisfied.

Botswana is taking its anti-crime campaign to a new level, Mmusi told journalists after the training session in the country's Gaborone by Chinese martial arts expert Edward Scott.

"We are seriously considering introducing Chinese martial arts into the police training curriculum," he added.

"Equipping our police officers with the Chinese martial arts techniques will go a long way in ensuring that law enforcement personnel is well protected and can defend themselves," Mmusi said.

According to the 2022 figures from Statistics Botswana on crime, cases involving the use of force were up compared to the previous year.

"So, the next time a criminal suspect is apprehended by a Botswana police officer, it may be due to a martial arts-style kick to the suspect's knees," said Mmusi.

Scott, 57, teaches police officers how to react as fast as possible with Chinese martial arts, especially when one is attacked with a knife or gun at close range.

Scott also runs a Kung Fu and healing center in Botswana. He said Chinese martial arts teach one to be observant at all times, a valuable skill for members of the Botswana Police Service.

Additionally, Scott said Chinese martial arts teaches discipline, saying Botswana cannot afford an undisciplined police force.

"Chinese martial arts help one to be able to go an extra mile in whatever he or she will be doing," said Scott. "It teaches one to do more with less." ■

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